Made for This

DAY 28

The scream ran its shockwaves through our entire house. Dad rushed into the room where my little brother and I had been playing to find Jared in tears, clutching his skull, me looking caught, and a very suspicious ping pong paddle wallowing in two pieces on the floor. “Kassie, what happened?” Dad demanded. “Well,” my little five-year-old self answered, “I accidentally broke the ping pong paddle over his head.” (Don’t worry. He’s fine now.)

Life is full of “accidents,” but friend, you’re not one of them. God made you on purpose, with purpose, for a purpose. As we begin the process of wrapping up our month of discovery, it’s a good time to remember that this isn’t just a pointless exercise in data gathering—it’s equipping for a big work with our name on it. Let’s bring the big pieces together and watch them crystallize into a practical, inspiring picture you can tuck into your pocket and take with you as you launch into whatever God has for you next. What are we talking about? Your own purpose statement.

“I define kingdom purpose as your specific contribution to the body of Christ, within your generation, that causes you to totally depend on God and authentically display His love toward others.”

(Erik Rees)

Scripture has a lot to say about our purpose on this earth: God formed us, called us, saved us, and invites us to advance His mission in unique ways. There are good works planned in advance for us to fulfill, and we have the Lord of Hosts working on our behalf. As you sink into who He’s made you, you’ll begin to notice how you can serve out of that design rather than against it or despite it. Your kingdom purpose “sweet spot” is the intersection between your personal abilities and personal passions. (It might be helpful to make a list for each and see what falls into both categories.)

So how does one go about designing a purpose statement? There are a few methods, but I’ll lay out my favorite. Grab a notebook and pen. Set your timer for ten minutes. For that span of time, free write—no worrying about spelling or punctuation or grammar—about how you’re created and what you long for God to do with your life. Don’t let your pen stop moving until the alarm goes off. Keep your wiring in mind, and dream big. This is no time for doubts or fears or details to bog you down. It’s a chance to let the Spirit infuse you with His excitement about what He’ll accomplish through you. If you were promised success in one major kingdom undertaking, what would it be? What would the success look like?

According to Ephesians 3:20, God “is able to do far more abundantly than all that we ask or imagine, according to the power at work within us.” With a promise that far-reaching, why not ask or imagine big? We don’t honor the Lord with small thinking. This is an opportunity to stretch our faith and see what happens.

After you’ve finished your ten minutes, it’s time to chop. Pick out words, phrases, sentences that really get at the heart of what you’re feeling called to aim for; ditch the rest. Feel free to sharpen and tweak as you go—a purpose statement is a soulish thing, and it shifts as it grows up.

When you’re feeling good about your purpose, allow a few wise believers around you to speak into it. Do they confirm this direction? Can they see major roadblocks you might need to address? Being teachable is the best way to begin (and continue along) any journey worth taking. Sit with the idea for a bit and see if it holds true. Take it for a test drive. Explore it from different angles. Learn all you can and move forward in faith.

No big sister breaks a wooden implement over her brother’s head on accident. No loving Father creates a complex, image-bearing life on accident. You are a child of purpose. Claim yours and watch God work wonders.

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